Misdirection in HealthCare


When The Digital Revolution Took a Wrong Turn

Posted on April 27, 2019 2:27 am By admin in Misdirection in HealthCare

The U.S. government claimed that turning medical charts into electronic records would make health care better, safer and cheaper. Ten years and $36 billion later, we became aware that the digital revolution had taken a very bad turn. Death By 1,000 Clicks: Where Electronic Health Records Went Wrong By Fred Schulte and Erika Fry, Fortune […]

The “New” Medical Morality: Hippocrates or Bioethics?

Posted on February 20, 2019 8:19 pm By admin in Misdirection in HealthCare

By Jeffrey Hall Dobken, M.D., M.P.H. David Rothman, the author of “Strangers at the Bedside,”1writes that the most “distinguishing characteristic of medical ethics [is] the extent to which it was monopolized by practicing physicians, not by formal [trained] philosophers.…” He asserted that serious social, behavioral, and cultural issues had to be confronted. These issues served […]

Modernization can at times be very expensive

Posted on October 10, 2018 1:20 pm By admin in Misdirection in HealthCare

I served my internship at Wayne County General Hospital. We were the first class of 36 interns to work in the new 500 bed orange and silver aluminum hospital built in the form of a Grecian cross-a square center with four arms of equal length. The old hospital had the standard characteristic large 40 to […]

Sham Peer Review

Posted on July 20, 2018 12:55 am By admin in Misdirection in HealthCare

PSYCHIATRIC EVALUATIONS ARE HAZARDOUS TO THE DOCTOR’S CAREER. By Richard B. Willner, Executive Director of The Center for Peer Review Justice http://www.PeerReviewJustice.org In this day of excessive regulation and hindsight aided evaluation a new danger is even more pressing.  Various administrative boards that are established by states, the federal government or associated agencies maybe have […]

Sham Peer Review Shelters a Deadly and Malicious Virus

Posted on April 3, 2018 5:23 am By admin in Misdirection in HealthCare

The Poliner Case: the Clinical Story Disingenuous “concern for patients” is used to conceal malicious motives in a legalized charade Lawrence R. Poliner, M.D. Like a deadly virus sheltered within an immune cell, peer review has been infected. Ironically, some, who have sworn to “first do no harm,” now use peer review as a weapon […]

Introduction of disruptive digital innovations

Posted on January 4, 2018 6:39 am By admin in Misdirection in HealthCare

Is Digital Health The Future Of Healthcare? –Originally appeared on Quora: the place to gain and share knowledge, empowering people to learn from others and better understand the world.     University of Texas School of Biomedical Informatics, Educating leaders in health informatics since 1997 Answered Mar 15, 2018 · Featured on Forbes and Apple News Author has 161 answers and 96k answer views Worldwide, healthcare […]

Regulating the Doctor/Patient interface

Posted on January 26, 2017 7:36 am By admin in Misdirection in HealthCare

Regulating the Doctor/Patient interface is a serious misdirection in American Health Care for which we are criticized with no convincing argument being raised by the medical profession because they have been hoodwinked by our organizations who emphasize improving quality when we already have the highest quality of medical care found anywhere in the world. Feedback […]

Medicaid Expansion Increased Health Insurance Enrollment

Posted on October 10, 2015 11:40 am By admin in Misdirection in HealthCare

October 23, 2015 Last year’s changes in health insurance enrollment are of particular interest, as 2014 was the year in which key provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA, or Obamacare) took effect — most notably, the offeringof subsidies for coverage purchased through the new government exchanges and the ACA’s Medicaid expansion. The increased enrollment […]

Medicare at Age 50: Unlikely to Make It to 100

Posted on July 10, 2015 11:28 am By admin in Misdirection in HealthCare

Americans born in 1900 and earlier were eligible for Medicare at its inception in 1965, but the life expectancy for men and women born in 1900 was under 50 years of age. The few men who lived to see their 65th birthdays around the time Medicare began could only expect to live another dozen years […]

Do Mammograms Save Lives?

Posted on April 10, 2014 12:37 pm By admin in Misdirection in HealthCare

In the 1980s, Dr. Eugene Robin, a Research Pulmonologist at Stanford, had a weekly column in the San Francisco Examiner. Having had a very distinguished career writing research papers, books, editing journals, chairing international symposia, he thought he’d try his hand in the popular press. In this column, he explored numerous areas of medicine for […]